herbs and information

Welcome

Hi and welcome to the wonderful world of herbs for wellbeing.  A lifelong passion and interest in all things floral has grown into a heightened sensitivity of the wellness plants bring each and everyone of us and how we can let them support us.  That feeling of wet grass on our feet, the sound of wind blowing through the trees, the smell of freshly wet ground after a long hot day, the joy of the first daffodil and blossom of spring – our spirits are lifted and calmed when we connect with nature.  And that’s how I choose to work with herbs and flower essences, letting the plant and its joyous nature do “its” work by being itself to bring harmony and restore balance.

Of course, we live in a 21st century world that seeks evidence, seeks clarity as to how, but I think that takes away some of the mystery and joy of the plant kingdom. If everything was clear cut and regimented – we would not have disease, there would be no disharmony, we would know exactly what to do to bring about health resolution through medicine alone. But it is way more complicated than that, we humans are way more complicated than that.

And so too is the plant kingdom. So below is what we “know” in evidence based perspectives of the herbs in Naturally Herbal products…… but there is so much more we don’t know….. and it is the unknown that is exciting for the plants themselves allow us to feel, to smell, to see and to be rejuvenated and restored by their very presence.

Meet The Chefs

Calendula officinalis

Calendula - Marigold

Part used: Dried flowers

Description: A regular sight in gardens and enjoyed all year for their bright bursts of sunshine yellow, Calendua is an old and distinguished herb in the herbalists repertoire.  Known for its topical use in skin conditions such as wounds or inflamed skin, sunburn, eczema, nappy rash and sunburn, Calendula is anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and can act as a vulnerary on varicose veins.

Constituents: triterpene glycosides, aglycones, flavonoids, coumarins, carotenoids, essential oils.  

Contra-Indications, Side Effects, Drug Interactions – none known.

Caution: allergic to those sensitive to Asteraceae family

Alnuqaydan, A. M., Lenehan, C. E., Hughes, R. R., & Sanderson, B. J. (2015). Extracts from Calendula officinalis Offer in Vitro Protection Against H2 O2 Induced Oxidative Stress Cell Killing of Human Skin Cells. In Phytotherapy Research, 29(1), 120–124. https://doi.org/10.1002/ptr.5236

American Botanical Council. (2013). Commission E Monographs – Approved Herbs: Calendula. Retrieved from http://cms.herbalgram.org

Bone, K. (2007). The ultimate herbal compendium.  Warwick, Australia: Phytotherapy Press.

Fisher, C. (2009). Materia medica. Auckland, New Zealand: Fisher.

Symphytum officinale Comfrey also known as Boneset or Knitbone

Part used: dried leaves

Description: a perennial plant that dies back in winter, Comfrey graces many a garden here in New Zealand, though originally from Europe, prized for its dense luscious leaves in beds and borders.  Comfrey has a long traditional use for skin and musculoskeletal injuries where compresses or ointments are applied. It is known for its anti-inflammatory, vulnerary and demulcent actions that support skin conditions like eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, insect bites as well as sprains, strains and fractures. May give temporary relief for arthritic conditions in fingers and joints.

External use only of leaf preparation is permitted in NZ.

Constituents: allantonin, mucilage, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, phenolic acids.

Caution: Topical use only.

American Botanical Council. (2013). Commission E Monographs – Approved Herbs: Comfrey. Retrieved from http://cms.herbalgram.org

Bone, K. (2007). The ultimate herbal compendium.  Warwick, Australia: Phytotherapy Press.

Fisher, C. (2009). Materia medica. Auckland, New Zealand: Fisher

Frost, R., Macpherson, H., & O’Meara, S. (2013). A critical scoping review of external uses of comfrey (Symphytum spp.). Complementary Therapies in Medicine21(6), 724–745. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2013.09.009